History Parkes

stories, photos, anecdotes….. sharing the past

Jim Bailey – misunderstood middle-distance misfit!

Jim Bailey. Middle-distance athlete for Australia. Source: Oregon Sports Hall of Fame website

Jim Bailey. Middle-distance athlete for Australia. Source: Oregon Sports Hall of Fame website

With the upcoming Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, the Parkes Library history blog will focus on Olympians from the Parkes Shire. Each post will provide a snapshot of the sportsmen and sportswomen who have worn the green and gold and called the Parkes Shire home at some point of their lives. The 1950s were a golden era for sports stars from the Parkes Shire, with two representatives in athletics at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics. This post will be a snapshot of the second athlete who hailed from the Parkes Shire, James John “Jim” Bailey, who was a middle distance runner.

Jim Bailey was the son of a health and buildings inspector with Parkes Municipal Council. Bailey was born on July 21, 1929. He moved to the Parkes Shire with his family when he was 18 months old and remained here for the first ten years of his life (Source: The Champion Post Monday May 8, 1956, page 1) The Bailey family moved to Hurstville and Jim joined the St George Athletics Club. Inter-club athletics attracted more spectator and media attention in the 1950s and Jim proved to be a successful half-miler (880 yards) and mile runner (1500 metres). This was the era of other fantastic athletes in these events such as John Plummer, Dave White and Bill Ramsay. However Bailey’s biggest rival was the legendary John Landy.

Parkes Shire's Jim Bailey, running for St George Athletics Club, defeats John Plummer - then the State half-mile champion - in the 880 yards at Henson Park on Saturday October 28th 1950. Source: The Sunday Herald Sunday 29 October 1950, page 12

Parkes Shire’s Jim Bailey, running for St George Athletics Club, defeats John Plummer – then the State half-mile champion – in the 880 yards at Henson Park on Saturday October 28th 1950. Source: The Sunday Herald Sunday 29 October 1950, page 12

Bailey finished in a dead heat with David White in 880 yards in the 1948-49 championships. As Bailey was unable to contest the rerun, it is recorded that White finished first, Bailey second. However Bailey was to be outright winner two years later, finishing in 1:54.9 with David White runner up. At this time John Landy was also coming through the ranks, finishing second and the first in the next two years respectively. In the 1953-54 championships Bailey again won the 880 yards with a time of 1:53.2. The same championships Bailey was runner up in the mile to John Landy. Bailey’s time was 4:12.8 and Landy’s was 4:05.6. Later in 1954, Britain’s Roger Bannister would break the four minute mile. On 6 May 1954, Bannister broke the four minute barrier in front of a crowd of 3,000 spectators in Oxford, England. Bannister’s time was 3 minutes 59.4 seconds. His record stood for 46 days before it was beaten in an athletics meet in Turku, Finland. The athlete was John Landy, with a time of 3:57.9.

The depth of talent in athletics in 1950s Australia is showcased here on the historical records of Australian Athletics' website. Jim Bailey was 880 yards national champion twice, as well as a 'dead heat' with David White. Source: Australian Athletics website

The depth of talent in athletics in 1950s Australia is showcased here on the historical records of Australian Athletics’ website. Jim Bailey was 880 yards national champion twice, as well as a ‘dead heat’ with David White. Other famous names include John Landy and Herb Elliott. Source: Australian Athletics website

Records of Australian Track & Field Championships for 1 mile. Jim Bailey was runner up to John Landy in 1953-54. Other illustrious names include John Plummer, Don MacMillan, Herb Elliott and Ron Clarke. Source: Athletics Australia website

Records of Australian Track & Field Championships for 1 mile. Jim Bailey was runner up to John Landy in 1953-54. Other illustrious names include John Plummer, Don MacMillan, Herb Elliott and Ron Clarke. Source: Athletics Australia website

Another inter-club athletics meeting at Henson Park, another victory for Jim Bailey. Source: The Sunday Herald Sunday 14 January 1951, page 12

Another inter-club athletics meeting at Henson Park, another victory for Jim Bailey. Source: The Sunday Herald Sunday 14 January 1951, page 12

While Bailey continued to win inter-club athletics meetings and he was invited to Victoria at a special meeting, the ‘christening’ of Melbourne’s Olympic Park cinders track. Bailey won but like many of the other athletes found the cinder track hard. Jim Bailey caught the eye of fellow athlete, and later sports reporter for L’Équipe,  Michel Clare who convinced Bailey to travel to France to gain experience on cinder tracks and study style and relaxation techniques. (Source: Running: Star Off To France (1951, June 30).Sporting Globe (Melbourne, Vic. : 1922 – 1954), , p. 11. Retrieved July 6, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193641613 and Olympic Hope (1951, July 1). Sunday Mail (Brisbane) (Qld. : 1926 – 1954), , p. 13. Retrieved July 6, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article98338287)

Jim Bailey was invited to race in the 880 yards of the Victorian Amateur Athletics Association's special athletics meet. The depth of half-mile runners in Australia is highlighted and Bailey at the time had the fastest figures in Australia. Source: The Age Saturday 27 January 1951, page 20

Jim Bailey was invited to race in the 880 yards of the Victorian Amateur Athletics Association’s special athletics meet. The depth of half-mile runners in Australia is highlighted and Bailey at the time had the fastest figures in Australia. Source: The Age Saturday 27 January 1951, page 20

Jim Bailey wins again! The first athletics meet at the new Olympic Park, built for the 1956 Olympic Games, saw Bailey defeat an impressive field in the 880 yards. Source: Sporting Globe Saturday 27 January 1951, page 10

Jim Bailey wins again! The first athletics meet at the new Olympic Park, built for the 1956 Olympic Games, saw Bailey defeat an impressive field in the 880 yards. Source: Sporting Globe Saturday 27 January 1951, page 10

Photograph of Jim Bailey winning the 880 yards at Olympic Park. The new cinders track felt hard to Bailey, a far cry from the grass athletics fields in the Parkes Shire that he ran on. Source: The Argus Monday 29 January 1951, page 13

Photograph of Jim Bailey winning the 880 yards at Olympic Park. The new cinders track felt hard to Bailey, a far cry from the grass athletics fields in the Parkes Shire that he ran on. Source: The Argus Monday 29 January 1951, page 13

From living in Parkes to setting a record in the United States of America. Newspaper report on son of former Parkes Health Inspector racing against the best American athletes at the annual Sugar Bowl Collegiate track meet in New Orleans. Source: The Champion Post Thursday January 5, 1956 page 3

From living in Parkes to setting a record in the United States of America. Newspaper report on son of former Parkes Health Inspector racing against the best American athletes at the annual Sugar Bowl Collegiate track meet in New Orleans. Source: The Champion Post Thursday January 5, 1956 page 3

Having been unsuccessful to make the Olympic team for the Helsinki Olympics in 1952, Bailey accepted a scholarship to study geology at University of Oregon. He quickly established himself on their athletics team at collegiate track & field meetings. In preparations for the Melbourne Olympic Games, Bailey took part in a special event in Los Angeles with John Landy. The aim was the promote the Melbourne Games and to have Landy break the four minute mile on US soil. While Landy was the favourite, Bailey surprised everyone – himself included – when he defeated Landy in a time of 3:58.6. This was the first time that the four minute barrier had been broken on US soil. When Bailey returned to Australia he was asked on his chances at the Melbourne Olympics. Bailey replied that he thought he could beat John Landy again. The mood of the public turned against him. In an interview 50 years to the day since his amazing achievement, Bailey explains the treatment he received and why it occurred:

Bailey won in 3 minutes, 58.6 seconds. He gained international fame when all he wanted was to get an invitation to the Australian Olympic trials later that year.

Bailey admits now that he didn’t handle the victory well.

Upon returning to Australia, he announced he was in better shape than he had been when he beat Landy, and he’d beat him by an even wider margin the next time they met.

“They would have excused me if I had been more apologetic about beating Landy and not said the things I did,” he said. “Landy was so popular, the way swimmer Ian Thorpe is now. I got death threats for what I’d done, and I was booed at the trials.”

Bailey, a former pro rugby player, was cast as the roughneck from Sydney. Landy, the former record holder, was cast as the gentleman from Melbourne. Bailey admits the characterizations were closer to the truth than not.

Bailey made the Australian Olympic team in both the 800 and 1,500 meters, but didn’t get out of the semifinals in the 800 and never ran the 1,500.

“I wasn’t right, mentally or physically,” he said.

To this day, Bailey says failing in the Olympics, in front of his countrymen, left more of an impression on his life than beating Landy and running the first sub-4 in America.

“I was completely overwhelmed by what happened in Melbourne and never recovered from it,” he said.

Source: The Seattle Times Sunday April 30, 2006

Jim Bailey's victory over John Landy makes the front page of the local paper. The Champion Post rang Bailey's dad to discuss his son's achievement. The article highlights the mutual friendship between Landy and Bailey. However national media would portray Bailey as the threat to "golden boy" Landy and this resulted in the mood of the Australian public turning against Bailey. Source: The Champion Post Monday May 8, 1956, page 1

Jim Bailey’s victory over John Landy makes the front page of the local paper. The Champion Post rang Bailey’s dad to discuss his son’s achievement. The article highlights the mutual friendship between Landy and Bailey. However national media would portray Bailey as the threat to “golden boy” Landy and this resulted in the mood of the Australian public turning against Bailey. Source: The Champion Post Monday May 8, 1956, page 1

Another report on Bailey defeating Landy, with a less than flattering nickname for Jim Bailey. Such was the depth of Australian athletics at this time, with Ron Clarke to follow in Bailey and Landy's footsteps. Source: The Perth Mirror Saturday 12 May 1956, page 14

Another report on Bailey defeating Landy, with a less than flattering nickname for Jim Bailey. Such was the depth of Australian athletics at this time, with Ron Clarke to follow in Bailey and Landy’s footsteps. Source: The Perth Mirror Saturday 12 May 1956, page 14

While the rivalry between Landy and Bailey brought a lot of attention to middle-distance running, in reality the two were friends. Bailey continually referred to Landy as ‘The Master’ and promoted Landy’s achievements to a sceptical American audience. Bailey helped establish middle-distance running in the North West of the US, winning the NCAA mile in 1955 and helping fellow Oregon runners such as Bill Dellinger, Jim Grelle, Dyrol Burleson, Steve Prefontaine and Alberto Salazar. Source: University of Oregon Sub4 Milers video https://youtu.be/MgSYvWt6O1k and The Seattle Times Sunday April 30, 2006

Jim Bailey remembered as one of the University of Oregon's finest athletes. Source: University of Oregon Sports History website

Jim Bailey remembered as one of the University of Oregon’s finest athletes. Source: University of Oregon Sports History website

While Bailey has been almost forgotten about in Australia, he is still remembered in United States. While one misplaced comment to the media cemented his role as “villain” in the perspective of Australians, the truth is that he was a man and athlete of generosity and sportsmanship. Before defeating Landy in America, Australian official and fellow athletes had nicknamed him “Mr Second”. Bailey respected Landy and believed that John Landy would not be beaten and argued this fact with Americans who diminished Landy’s efforts, disbelieving that anyone other than an American would win Olympic gold in the half-mile and mile events. Bailey regularly assisted with training juniors at St George Athletics Club. Source: The Perth Mirror Saturday 12 May 1956, page 12

Jim Bailey returned to United States after the Olympics, working as a rep for sportswear before moving into the real estate business. Jim did competing in 1954 Empire Games in Vancouver, when Bannister defeated Landy, however he was injured in the final of the 800m event. The insult of being booed by his fellow countrymen led to below par performances in 800 metres and withdrawing from the 1,500 metres. However he leaves a positive legacy with the youngster of St George Athletics Club in the 1950s, and with University of Oregon athletics team. Bailey describes himself as “a misfit living on the edge.” Source: The Seattle Times Sunday April 30, 2006 Yet this doesn’t give a complete picture of the athlete and person that Jim Bailey is. He was one of a golden generation of Australian athletes. Bailey was a dedicated athlete, leaving Australia for France and later the United States of America in pursuit of bettering his technique and times with the aim of representing his country. He coached youngsters and adults, even assisting fellow runners especially in Oregon. He is also one of a small elite band of men and women who are Olympians of the Parkes Shire.

Jim Bailey, given a plaque on the 50th anniversary of his achievement - first sub 4 minute mile run on US soil - living in Bellingham, Washington. Source: The Seattle Times Sunday April 30, 2006

Jim Bailey, given a plaque on the 50th anniversary of his achievement – first sub 4 minute mile run on US soil – living in Bellingham, Washington. Source: The Seattle Times Sunday April 30, 2006

Parkes Shire Library would like to thank the following organisations for their assistance in making this post possible:

If you have stories or memories that you are willing to share about Jim Bailey or any of the other Olympians of the Parkes Shire , please contact Parkes Shire Library via library@parkes.nsw.gov.au so that they can be shared and kept for posterity on this blog. Alternatively you may leave comments on this page.

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This entry was posted on July 6, 2016 by in 1950s, collegiate track and field, comeback, controversy, famous people of Parkes Shire, General history, local historical articles, Olympians of the Parkes Shire, Olympic Games, Parkes, Training in France, Training in USA, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .
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