History Parkes

stories, photos, anecdotes….. sharing the past

A look back… at the winter of 1932

Two images from 1932. On the left, a postage stamp commemorating the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, which was officially opened on March 19, 1932. On the right is an Australian penny made in 1932. Source: Postage stamp from Wikimedia Commons and One penny from TDK Australian Pre-Decimal Coins website

Two images from 1932. On the left, a postage stamp commemorating the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, which was officially opened on March 19, 1932. On the right is an Australian penny made in 1932. Source: Postage stamp from Wikimedia Commons and One penny from TDK Australian Pre-Decimal Coins website

This post will continue to highlight a particular time in the vast history of the Parkes Shire, focusing on the winter of 1932. A comparison of newspapers – then and now – plus highlighting the issues of the day facing Parkes Shire residents of 1932.

In 1932 the ruling monarch was King George V, the grandfather of current monarch Queen Elizabeth II.  Prime Minister of the day was Joseph Lyons, so far the only Tasmanian to be prime minister. A state election had just been completed, necessitated because Premier Jack Lang was dismissed by the Governor, Sir Philip Game. Television was still two decades away from reality with Australians relying heavily on radio and newspapers for their information. The Sydney Harbour Bridge was only a few months old, and The Dog on the Tuckerbox at Gundagai had not yet been unveiled.

The Front Page – then and now!

Front page comparison – 1932 and 2017! The name may have changed but this is the same newspaper, 85 years ago and today. Newer technology has allowed for colour print, different fonts and even colour photographs for the 2017 version. 1932's front page packs more words in, partly due to a smaller type size and less advertisements. Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 and Parkes Champion Post Friday June 23, 2017

Front page comparison – 1932 and 2017! The name may have changed but this is the same newspaper, 85 years ago and today. Newer technology has allowed for colour print, different fonts and even colour photographs for the 2017 version. 1932’s front page packs more words in, partly due to a smaller type size and less advertisements (although the advertisements are larger than the contemporary ones). Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 and Parkes Champion Post Friday June 23, 2017

Making News in 1932

The relationship between hockey and Parkes is quite well-known. In 1932 a newspaper article appeared on the front page that may be the genesis of the affection for the game in the Parkes shire. Two notable hockey players who used to live in the Parkes Shire include Olympians Stephen Davies and Mariah Williams.

Parkes has a long association with hockey - producing many champions including Olympians Stephen Davies and Mariah Williams. This article may highlight the genesis of this long and fruitful connection between hockey and the people of Parkes. Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 1

Parkes has a long association with hockey – producing many champions including Olympians Stephen Davies and Mariah Williams. This article may highlight the genesis of this long and fruitful connection between hockey and the people of Parkes. Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 1

As part of our Olympians of the Parkes Shire blog series, there are blog posts about Stephen Davies and Mariah Williams (click on the names to go to each blog post)
Travel in 1932 was very different to today. Distances seemed further and less people had their own motor vehicles. More people relied on public transport, including the railway. This article highlighted the need for continued railway service especially at Bogan Gate. Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 1

Travel in 1932 was very different to today. Distances seemed further and less people had their own motor vehicles. More people relied on public transport, including the railway. This article highlighted the need for continued railway service especially at Bogan Gate. Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 1

Two newspapers 85 years apart in time, yet both feature articles on the Westcott family. On the left, The Western Champion details the Westcott's factory recent appointment of a first class Sydney tradesman. On right, information about the upcoming Westcott family reunion in present day newspaper. Source: The Western Champion August 4, 1932 page 6 and Parkes Champion Post Friday June 23, 2017 page 2

Two newspapers 85 years apart in time, yet both feature articles on the Westcott family. On the left, The Western Champion details the Westcott’s factory recent appointment of a first class Sydney tradesman. On right, information about the upcoming Westcott family reunion in present day newspaper. Source: The Western Champion August 4, 1932 page 6 and Parkes Champion Post Friday June 23, 2017 page 2

The weather was still an important topic in 1932. In The Western Champion Mandagery received 117 points (29.7mm) while Alectown and Bogan Gate received regular rain but not enough for the farmers Click here to view full report. Conversion calculator used via Bureau of Meteorology website http://www.bom.gov.au/lam/calc.shtml

Part of the State Library of Victoria's newspaper collection is this colour pictorial from The Australasian. It includes images of all major football clubs competing in the various codes in 1932. South Sydney (bottom row third from left) would win the NSW Rugby League competition, defeating Western Suburbs 19-12. Richmond (top row fourth from right) were the premiers of Victorian Football League (precursor to the Australian Football League) defeating Carlton 13.14 (92) to 12.11 (83) Source: Boyles Football Photos website

Part of the State Library of Victoria’s newspaper collection is this colour pictorial from The Australasian. It includes images of the captains of all major football clubs competing in the various codes in 1932. South Sydney (bottom row third from left) would win the NSW Rugby League competition, defeating Western Suburbs 19-12. Richmond (top row fourth from right) were the premiers of Victorian Football League (precursor to the Australian Football League) defeating Carlton 13.14 (92) to 12.11 (83) Source: Boyles Football Photos website

Comparing two newspapers. On the right a small section dedicated to football (rugby league) mentioning Trundle. Apart from an even smaller article about weather, Trundle isn't mentioned again. Compared to a half-page in the present day newspaper, including a colour photograph. The idea of women playing sport (with the exception of tennis and swimming) was unthinkable in 1932. People's Park is the previous name to present day Pioneer Memorial Oval. Sources: Parkes Champion Post Friday June 23, 2017 page 9 and The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 6

Comparing two newspapers. On the right a small section dedicated to football (rugby league) mentioning Trundle. Apart from an even smaller article about weather, Trundle isn’t mentioned again. Compared to a half-page in the present day newspaper, including a colour photograph. The idea of women playing sport (with the exception of tennis and swimming) was unthinkable in 1932. People’s Park is the previous name to present day Pioneer Memorial Oval. Sources: Parkes Champion Post Friday June 23, 2017 page 9 and The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 6

1932 was a golden year for Australian literature. Parkes shire residents would be able to get their hands on first publications of many books now considered icons of Australian 20th Century literature. Published items in 1932 included two more novels by prolific detective novelist Arthur Upfield – A Royal Abduction and Gripped By Drought. Norman Lindsay also published two works – The Cautious Amorist and Miracles By Arrangement (which was published in the US as Mr Gresham and Olympus).

Ion Idriess was already a popular Australian author and in 1932 he published a biography of founder of the Royal Flying Doctors service, John Flynn, titled Flynn of the Inland.

Lauded as one of the best Australian writers of the 20th Century, Eleanor Dark, published her debut novel, Slow Dawning in 1932. Dark would be better known in later years for the first book in a trilogy The Timeless Land (1941) with Storm of Time (1948) and No Barrier (1953). Eleanor Dark’s family home “Varuna” in Katoomba was given to the Eleanor Dark Foundation and is a writers’ retreat known as Varuna, The Writers’ House.

Poetry received greater recognition in 1932 than today, with C.J. Dennis composing “‘I Dips me Lid’ to the Sydney Harbour Bridge” and famous Scottish-Australian poet, horseman and friend of Harry “The Breaker” Morant – Will Ogilvie – publishing in 1932 The Collected Sporting Verse of Will H. Ogilvie

To read more about Breaker Morant, Will Ogilvie and their connection to Bogan Gate click here

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1932 NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENTS

Holidays were still important to the hardworking residents of the Parkes Shire. However June 1932 and the world was still in then grips of The Great Depression. By June 1932 unemployment was high, with almost 32 per cent of Australians out of work. Going away for holidays didn't mean overseas, rather interstate. Instead of arriving to your destination on an aeroplane, travelling was done by sea. Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 13

Holidays were still important to the hardworking residents of the Parkes Shire. However in June 1932 the world was still in the grips of The Great Depression. By June 1932 unemployment was high, with almost 32 per cent of Australians out of work. Going away for holidays didn’t mean overseas, rather interstate. Instead of arriving to your destination on an aeroplane, travelling was done by sea. Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 13

The style of advertising may have been different, but some products were the same as today! This advertisement for Uncle Toby's Oats highlights "...definite economy in use..." - in the midst of The Great Depression consumers were frugal and looking for value. Due to high unemployment leading to poverty may explain the necessity for a line such as "...the most valuable food for poor and rich alike." Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23 1932 page 13

The style of advertising may have been different, but some products were the same as today! This advertisement for Uncle Toby’s Oats highlights “…definite economy in use…” – in the midst of The Great Depression consumers were frugal and looking for value. The high unemployment leading to poverty may explain the necessity for a line such as “…the most valuable food for poor and rich alike.” Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23 1932 page 13

If Parkes residents wanted the finest in automotives in 1932, they would have bought British! On the left is an advertisement for the new "Empire" Model Bean 2 Tons truck. Right is an image of one of the many Bean Commercial vehicles - highlighting it was the first vehicle to cross the Australian continent! Sources: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 10 and An advert from The Times Trade & Engineering Supplement, 25th May, 1929 found on British History website

If Parkes residents wanted the finest in automotives in 1932, they would have bought British! On the left is an advertisement for the new “Empire” Model Bean 2 Tons truck. Right is an image of one of the many Bean Commercial vehicles – highlighting it was the first vehicle to cross the Australian continent! Sources: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 10 and An advert from The Times Trade & Engineering Supplement, 25th May, 1929 found on British History website

It wasn't always the good old days in 1932! Dreariness was a real problem according to an advertisement of the time! The advertisement for a medicine appeared in The Western Champion June 23, 1932 page 12

It wasn’t always the good old days in 1932! Dreariness was a real problem according to an advertisement of the time! The advertisement for a medicine appeared in The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 11

Not everything has changed since 1932 - Johnson's Bakery is still open for business and located on Welcome Street in Parkes. The phone number is now 6862 2291! Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 16

Not everything has changed since 1932 – Johnson’s Bakery is still open for business and located on Welcome Street in Parkes. The phone number is now 6862 2291! Source: The Western Champion Thursday June 23, 1932 page 15

Winter advertisements in 1932 and 2017. On the left is The Western Champion's Special Champion Feature Amongst The Stores which focuses on some of the bargains Parkes consumers could purchase in 1932. Images are used minimally, with the page full of text. Compare this to a present day advertisement in Parkes Champion Post. Colour images and photographs, less text and less retailers featured but each one given greater space. Sources: The Western Champion Thursday June 16, 1932 page 7 and Parkes Champion Post Friday June 23, 2017 page 10

REFERENCE LIST

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This entry was posted on June 27, 2017 by in 1930s, 1932 Newspaper Advertisements, 2017, A Look Back... At the Winter of 1932, General history, Humour, Making News in 1932, The Front Page... then and now!, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .
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