History Parkes

stories, photos, anecdotes….. sharing the past

Daroobalgie

Feature picture of Daroobalgie highlighting past and present. Top: photograph of the Central West Boomerangs, one of many "snowball" marches during the Great War; centre, current photo of the disused Daroobalgie Abbatoir buildings; and bottom, Parkes motocross riders at the Forbes Auto Sports Club at Daroobalgie.

Feature picture of Daroobalgie highlighting past and present. Top: photograph of the Central West Boomerangs, one of many “snowball” marches during the Great War; centre, current photo of the disused Daroobalgie Abbatoir buildings; and bottom, Parkes motocross riders at the Forbes Auto Sports Club at Daroobalgie.

Of all the towns and villages within the Parkes Shire LGA, the southern-most is Daroobalgie. While being closer to Forbes than Parkes, it contains the 2870 postcode. Similarly to nearby Nelungaloo, Daroobalgie shares parts of its history with Forbes as well as Parkes. Long term residents will remember the meatworks and freezer works situated here, while many people can tell if you’re a local if you know how to pronounce it  (HINT: it’s pronounced with a lot less letters than how it’s spelt – droo-BALL-ghee)

It still contains buildings that historians love to look at. Indeed it’s position in Australian history is assured, seeing as it played a part in one of the many “snowball marches” of the First World War.

History of Daroobalgie

Excerpt from Royal Australian Historical Society highlighting the definition of Daroobalgie. Source: Royal Australian Historical Society Volume 13 Part 2 (1927) p.86 found at https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-598291513/view?sectionId=nla.obj-606024376&searchTerm=daroobalgie&partId=nla.obj-598310351#page/n51/mode/1up/search/daroobalgie

Excerpt from Royal Australian Historical Society Journal highlighting the definition of Daroobalgie. Source: Royal Australian Historical Society Journal and Proceedings Volume 13 Part 2 (1927) p.86

Daroobalgie is first mentioned in The New South Wales Government Gazette in 1848, when a licence to depasture stock at Daroobalgie had been given to Thomas Arkell. (Source: New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 – 1900), Tuesday February 1, 1848 [Issue No.13] p. 161.) Arkell’s pastoral lease was given in 1839, according to Hildred (1997) p.47. This excellent resource, Forbes, New South Wales, Australia highlights that the definition for Daroobalgie is an Aboriginal word for “jumping into water” (Source: NSWRail.net website) and that like so many place names years ago had an additional way of spelling it DROUBALGIE:

Droubalgie (Aboriginal for jumping into water) was first taken up as a pastoral lease by Thomas Arkell in 1839 and incorporated half of what is now Forbes, the other half was part of Bogabigal: lore has it that the boundaries of Droubalgie and Bogabigal were either where the Lands Office now is or at Ranken [sic] Street.

Mr George Ranken owned Bogabigal Droubalgie extended north from the Lachlan River towards Parkes where it had a common boundary with Bartley’s Creek, now owned by the Tom family.

The accompanying sketch [see below] of ‘Commissioner’s Camp Forbes about 1860’ was given to my mother, Helen Wilson, in 1934 by the daughter of Edward Combes and shows the eastern side of Droubalgie homestead which is built of pit-sawn timber and had a shingle roof (now under corrugated iron). [Brunel Combes is listed as being the Government Surveyor in the Australian Almanac of 1866].

After Thomas Arkell it was owned for many years by Martin Bros, then passed briefly to the Corby family from whom my father, Charles S. Wilson, bought it in 1925. The Wilsons had owned Lake Cowal station at Marsden since 1878 and Charles Wilson had a block called Caloola. In 1923 he married Helen Stitt of Wandary. They lived at Caloola for two years then moved to Droubalgie to take advantage of the fertile river flats and plentiful water of the Lachlan, not to mention being closer to family at Wandary.

In 1926 Charles Wilson built a suspension bridge between Droubalgie and Wandary, not so much for social reasons but to take the Droubalgie sheep to Wandary shearing shed. Droubalgie shearing shed was burnt down in the time of a previous owner who used the insurance money to pay for his daughter’s wedding. The suspension bridge was destroyed by floods in the early 1950s.

Allan Wilson in Hildred (1997) pp.47-48

Census results when Daroobalgie was counted on its own. *** Please note the 1947 Census tally is combined from results Daroobalgie (68), near Daroobalgie (50), and Front Daroobalgie (63). Source: ABS website

Census results when Daroobalgie was counted on its own. *** Please note the 1947 Census tally is combined from results Daroobalgie (68), near Daroobalgie (50), and Front Daroobalgie (63). Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics website

Forbes historian, Max Thomas, explained that the parish of Bocobidgle – in the Ashburnham county – was once the name for Daroobalgie. However the “Droubalgie Run” was established and that name eventually formed into ‘Daroobalgie’ for the village’s name. In its heyday Daroobalgie had a school, post office, a few shops as well as a cricket team.

Sketch of Commissioner's Camp circa 1860 which became 'Droubalgie' homestead. Source: Forbes, New South Wales, Australia by Jeannette Hildred (Editor) p.47

Sketch of Commissioner’s Camp circa 1860 which became ‘Droubalgie’ homestead. Source: Forbes, New South Wales, Australia by Jeannette Hildred (Editor) p.47

Letter home from France during First World War, to a resident of Daroobalgie. Source: The Forbes Advocate Friday July 27, 1917 p.1 found at https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/100286218?

Letter home from France during First World War, to a resident of Daroobalgie. To read the article in its entirety click here. Source: The Forbes Advocate Friday July 27, 1917 p.1

Map of Daroobalgie in relation to Forbes and Parkes. Source: Whereis.com

Map of Daroobalgie in relation to Forbes and Parkes. Source: Whereis.com

Mr and Mrs Field announce the birth of their son. The Fields looked after Daroobalgie Post Office at the time. Source: The Forbes Advocate Friday June 9, 1944, p.2 found at http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218693953

Mr and Mrs Field announce the birth of their son. The Fields looked after Daroobalgie Post Office at the time. Source: The Forbes Advocate Friday June 9, 1944, p.2

Sport - always an integral part of life in the Central West - makes the news, with the first grade draw for the Forbes District Cricket Competition. To view this article in its entirety click here. Source: The Forbes Advocate Friday 6 October 1950, p.11

Sport – always an integral part of life in the Central West – makes the news, with the first grade draw for the Forbes District Cricket Competition. To view this article in its entirety click here. Source: The Forbes Advocate Friday 6 October 1950, p.11

A stone implement with a conical shape at one end. This was found at Daroobalgie near the Lachlan River. Source: National Museum Australia website found at http://collectionsearch.nma.gov.au/object/199648

A stone implement with a conical shape at one end. This was found at Daroobalgie near the Lachlan River. Source: National Museum Australia website

The railway line still passes through Daroobalgie, although the railway station was closed on March 25, 1975.

The Stockinbingal-Parkes line highlighting the years of use for Daroobalgie. Source: NSWrail.net website found at https://www.nswrail.net/lines/show.php?name=NSW:stockinbingal_parkes

The Stockinbingal-Parkes line highlighting the years of use for Daroobalgie. Source: NSWrail.net website

Boomerangs March

The Boomerangs as they marched into Parkes before heading to Daroobalgie on their way to Bathurst. Source: Flickr.com website found at https://www.flickr.com/photos/statelibraryofnsw/6003775047

The Boomerangs as they marched into Parkes before heading to Daroobalgie on their way to Bathurst. Source: Flickr.com website

The “snowball” marches were recruitment marches that started in country towns of New South Wales during the Great War. The aim was to increase recruitment into the Australian Imperial Force while also raising awareness amongst communities. The Australian War Memorial website records:

In 1915 recruiting committees were formed in nearly every town throughout Australia. In the central west of New South Wales a movement began which became known as the ‘Gilgandra snowball’. Under the leadership of W.T. (‘Captain Bill’) Hitchen, 20 or so men who had determined to enlist started off to march to Sydney. Gathering other recruits along the way, they numbered about 300 by the time they reached Sydney. This was known as the Coo-ee March.

Their example was soon followed by other marches from around New South Wales and Queensland: the Waratahs, Kangaroos, Wallabies, Dungarees, Men from Snowy River, Kurrajongs, Kookaburras, Central West Boomerangs and North Coast Boomerangs. They relied on the support of the communities they passed through, which was often enthusiastic. The total number of men involved was only about 1,500 but the marches attracted wide publicity and may have encouraged fund-raising and enlistment more generally.

Australian War Memorial website

The "snowball" marches of the Great War that impacted communities in regards to recruitment and awareness. Sources: Australian War Memorial website, South Coast Register website, Gilgandra Diggers website, Daily Examiner website and State Library Queensland website.

The “snowball” marches of the Great War that impacted communities in regards to recruitment and awareness. Sources: Australian War Memorial website, South Coast Register website, Gilgandra Diggers website, Daily Examiner website and State Library Queensland website.

The Central West Boomerangs took the following route:

Route: from Parkes the Boomerangs took the train to Daroobalgie then marched to Donaghey’s Hill, Forbes, Yamma Station, Eugowra, Gooloogong, Canowindra, Billimari, Cowra, Woodstock, Lyndhurst, Carcoar, Blayney, Newbridge (to Georges Plains by train), Perthville, Bathurst.

They arrived in Bathurst almost at the same time as the Kookaburras and were given a combined reception. They entered the new Bathurst Show Ground Military Camp for training.

Each original Boomerang marcher was presented with a medallion brooch in the shape of a boomerang, etched with the name of the volunteer, his town and the words ‘Come back’.

Australian War Memorial website

Plaque commemorating the Boomerang March Re-enactment in 1999 from Parkes to Bathurst going via Daroobalgie. Source: Monument Australia website found at http://monumentaustralia.org.au/australian_monument/display/107671

Plaque commemorating the Boomerang March Re-enactment in 1999 from Parkes to Bathurst going via Daroobalgie. Source: Monument Australia website

Click here to read a newspaper report on the 2015 Boomerang March Re-enactment

Meatworks & Freezerworks

For most of the 20th Century, the main industry at Daroobalgie was the abattoir. The meatworks was used for all manner of meat production, including cattle, pigs and goats. In 1911 an update to the Meatworks meant it was among the best in New South Wales. It was also in the year that a 50-ton ice-making machine was installed. Daroobalgie now had a Freezerworks also (Source: Western Champion Friday March 10, 1911 p.10)

Built by William Angliss & Co - Between Parkes and Forbes (Daroobalgie), NSW. Source: NSW State Library Archives

Built by William Angliss & Co – Between Parkes and Forbes (Daroobalgie), NSW. Source: NSW State Library Archives

Photograph of Daroobalgie Freezing Works 1958. Source: Forbes Museum found at http://photosau.com.au/Forbes/scripts/ExtSearch.asp?SearchTerm=P00556used with permission

Photograph of Daroobalgie Freezing Works 1958. Source: Forbes Museum used with permission

A print advertisement for W. Angliss & Co. Australia based in Daroobalgie. Source: The Farmer and Settler Friday May 20, 1955 p.25 found at http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117412483

A print advertisement for W. Angliss & Co. Australia based in Daroobalgie. Source: The Farmer and Settler Friday May 20, 1955 p.25

Map of the County of Ashburnham in 1966. Daroobalgie is near the star. Just further south is the property of W. Angliss & Co. Source: Trove found at https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-511221876/view?searchTerm=daroobalgie#search/daroobalgie

Map of the County of Ashburnham in 1966. Daroobalgie is near the star. Just further south is the property of W. Angliss & Co. Source: Trove

Newspaper public notice informing of delivery dates of goats for Daroobalgie Meatworks. Source: Western Herald Friday December 13, 1963 p.8 found at http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142316736

Newspaper public notice informing of delivery dates of goats for Daroobalgie Meatworks. Source: Western Herald Friday December 13, 1963 p.8

Daroobalgie Meatworks bought by a syndicate of three Orange businessmen. Source: Western Herald Friday September 20, 1968 p.10 found at http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142507708

Daroobalgie Meatworks bought by a syndicate of three Orange businessmen. Source: Western Herald Friday September 20, 1968 p.10

The view looking south from the one-time station location shows what appears to be the old meat freezing works, which were served by several sidings. Source: NSWRail.net website

The view looking south from the one-time station location shows what appears to be the old meat freezing works, which were served by several sidings. Source: NSWRail.net website

Central West Livestock Exchange (aka “the Salesyards”)

The Central West Livestock Exchange at Daroobalgie was finally completed in 2006 after over ten years of planning. Allowing farmers from Parkes, Forbes and other surrounding towns with first class facilities for trading stock.

The first sale at the brand new Central West Livestock Exchange, near Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post Wednesday January 11, 2006 p.1

The first sale at the brand new Central West Livestock Exchange, near Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post Wednesday January 11, 2006 p.1

The newly opened Central West Livestock Exchange raises money for local charities. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday February 24, 2006 p.19

The newly opened Central West Livestock Exchange raises money for local charities. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday February 24, 2006 p.19

Dignitaries turn the first sod at stage two construction of Central West Livestock Exchange at Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday December 11, 2009 p.22

Dignitaries turn the first sod at stage two construction of Central West Livestock Exchange at Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday December 11, 2009 p.22

Opening of the new pig yards at Daroobalgie, 15 years in the planning and continuing a tradition that's nearly a century old. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday April 20, 2012, p.24

Opening of the new pig yards at Daroobalgie, 15 years in the planning and continuing a tradition that’s nearly a century old. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday April 20, 2012, p.24

A significant event - the Forbes First Cross Ewe Sale at the Central West Livestock Exchange at Daroobalgie, where more than 11,000 ewes were sold. Source: Parkes Phoenix Friday January 13, 2017 p.7

A significant event – the Forbes First Cross Ewe Sale at the Central West Livestock Exchange at Daroobalgie, where more than 11,000 ewes were sold. Source: Parkes Phoenix Friday January 13, 2017 p.7

Motocross & Dirt-Track

It is not surprising that Daroobalgie becomes another haven for sports lovers, given how much of the Parkes Shire’s past and present is linked with sport. Daroobalgie is the home of the motocross and dirt racing for the district. Continuing the link between the twin towns of Forbes and Parkes, the Forbes Motorcycle Club brings together riders and spectators from both towns and surrounding districts.

Daroobalgie is the home to motocross for both Forbes and Parkes riders. Source: Parkes Champion Post Monday August 11, 2008 p.15

Daroobalgie is the home to motocross for both Forbes and Parkes riders. Source: Parkes Champion Post Monday August 11, 2008 p.15

Parkes local, Frazer Miller, is seen in action here at Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post September 12, 2008 p.24

Parkes local, Frazer Miller, is seen in action here at Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post September 12, 2008 p.24

It's not just bikes but auto sports and go karts at Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday, April 24, 2009 p.26

It’s not just bikes but auto sports and go karts at Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday, April 24, 2009 p.26

Parkes resident, Brandon Ross, photographed in action at Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday July 24, 2009 p.19

Parkes resident, Brandon Ross, photographed in action at Daroobalgie. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday July 24, 2009 p.19

A great day for Parkes motocross riders, with several podium finishes for local riders. Source: Parkes Champion Post, Friday, August 7, 2009 p.27

A great day for Parkes motocross riders, with several podium finishes for local riders. Source: Parkes Champion Post Friday, August 7, 2009 p.27

The Future of Daroobalgie?

The future of Daroobalgie? A solar farm is proposed for Daroobalgie that has the capacity to power about 34,000 homes. Source: Parkes Champion Post Tuesday March 5, 2019 p.3

The future of Daroobalgie? A solar farm is proposed for Daroobalgie that has the capacity to power about 34,000 homes. Source: Parkes Champion Post Tuesday March 5, 2019 p.3

A poem, mentioning several towns and villages of the Parkes district including Daroobalgie. Source: The Australian Women's Weekly Wednesday November 6, 1963 p.86 found at http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51193820

A poem, mentioning several towns and villages of the Parkes district including Daroobalgie. Source: The Australian Women’s Weekly Wednesday November 6, 1963 p.86

Parkes Shire Library would like to thank the following people and organisations for their assistance in making this post possible:

HAVE WE MISSED SOMETHING???

If you have stories, photographs or memories that you are willing to share about Daroobalgie please contact Parkes Shire Library via dan.fredericks@parkes.nsw.gov.au so that they can be shared and kept for posterity on this blog. Alternatively you may leave comments on this page.

REFERENCE LIST

Feature Picture Images (from top to bottom)

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on February 28, 2020 by in 1860s, 1870s, 1880s, 1890s, 1900s, 1910s, 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, Boomerang March, Boomerangs March, Central West Livestock Exchange, Central West Livestock Exchange (aka "the Salesyards"), Daroobalgie, History of Daroobalgie, Meatworks & Freezerworks, Motocross & Dirt-Track, Reference List, The Future of Daroobalgie?, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Navigation

%d bloggers like this: