History Parkes

stories, photos, anecdotes….. sharing the past

Cec Pepper: The Parkes Lad Too Spicy for Bradman

Title picture of the larger than life personality that was Cecil 'Cec' Pepper. Clockwise from left: Cecil Pepper and Keith Miller walk out to bat during 1940s; author Ken Piesse in Parkes promoting the life story of Cec Pepper; front cover of Ken Piesse's book about Cec Pepper; and photograph of Sir Garfield Sobers and Cecil Pepper in the late 50s.

Title picture of the larger than life personality that was Cecil ‘Cec’ Pepper. Clockwise from left: Cecil Pepper and Keith Miller walk out to bat during 1940s; author Ken Piesse in Parkes promoting the life story of Cec Pepper; front cover of Ken Piesse’s book about Cec Pepper; and photograph of Sir Garfield Sobers and Cecil Pepper in the late 50s.

The Parkes Shire and its history is richly interwoven with sport. This is highlighted by the many parks and sporting fields located within the Parkes Shire. Many of these public amenities have been named after local sportsmen and sportswomen. Historyparkes has researched a few of these sporting grounds and the stories of the people they are named after. In addition, in the lead up to the Rio Olympics, historyparkes completed a series on the eight Olympians who at one time called the Parkes Shire home.

One of the more interesting characters has been almost forgotten.

Journalist Derek Hodgson wrote:

“… [Pep] would have to be among the world’s best half-dozen all-rounders yet because he played almost no first-class cricket in Britain, nor in an official Test match, his career and his stature have been greatly undervalued.”

(Independent website)

Thankfully his tale is captured in incredible detail by famous author, Ken Piesse. On November 16, 2018, Parkes Shire Library hosted the official launch of the book Pep: The Story of Cec Pepper, The Best Cricketer Never To Represent Australia. This blog post aims to give readers a taste of the wonderful tale encapsulated in Ken Piesse’s book, so that his story is never forgotten.

Photograph of the front cover of Ken Piesse's excellent book on Cecil Pepper. Painstakingly researched and completed with many photographs, it tells the tale of one of the most colourful - yet underappreciated - of Australia's sporting characters. Source: Author's website www.cricketbooks.com.au where you can purchase your own copy of this excellent book

Photograph of the front cover of Ken Piesse’s excellent book on Cecil Pepper. Painstakingly researched and complete with many photographs, it tells the tale of one of the most colourful – yet underappreciated – of Australia’s sporting characters. Source: Author’s website www.cricketbooks.com.au where you can purchase your own copy of this excellent book

To purchase your copy of
Pep: The Story of Cec Pepper, The Best Cricketer Never To Represent Australia
by Ken Piesse head to www.cricketbooks.com.au
Alternatively, copies are available at Parkes News & Gifts

Growing Up in Parkes

Cecil Pepper’s life began in neighbouring Forbes. According to Ken Piesse:

Cecil George Pepper was born on September 15, 1916 in Forbes….He was the second of three children. His parents George and Josephine married in 1912 when George was 27 and Jo 32. She’d had two children, Clarrie and Alf Jnr from her first marriage. Her husband Alf Johnson disappeared and left her to raise the toddlers alone….

Both [Cecil’s parents] contracted the Spanish Flu pandemic at the end of World War I, just after Cec was born. Their eldest, Alma Josephine (named after her mother) was born on January 22, 1914 and Keith Joseph on May 5, 1921.

A young Cec Pepper and his brother were forever outdoors, swimming and diving, playing cricket, tennis and golf, riding horses and exploring. ‘They lived a very free life as did most of the young ones, especially the boys,’ said Pepper’s niece, Jeanette Bond (nèe Pepper). ‘Cec’s sister Alma, my aunt, was expected to work more beside her mother, as the girls did back then. As the eldest she had extra responsibilities.’

Pepper was always a freewheeling maverick, undismayed by those discomforted by his boisterous, outspoken ways. Sister Karen at the local Catholic school was not a fan so Pep was moved to Parkes Public.

K. Piesse (2018) pages 5 and 6

Staff outside R.S. Howard stores, Clarinda Street, Parkes Source: State Library Archives

Staff outside R.S. Howard stores, Clarinda Street, Parkes Source: State Library Archives

Piesse paints an accurate picture of Parkes in the 1920s and 1930s. While life was peaceful and carefree, even the Central West was not isolated enough to avoid feeling consequences of The Great Depression. Many families found their living circumstances complicated due to the (First World) war and The Great Depression, according to Piesse (2018) page 6. Due to this, Pep and family lived in variety of locations including a beautiful old boarding house at the top of Church Street, Talbot Street and also in Peak Hill. Despite the circumstances, Jo Pepper – Cec’s mum – was described as high-spirited, hardworking and feisty.

In August 1926, it was announced that ‘Mrs George Pepper (recently of Forbes) has bought out Mrs Styles’ Refreshment Rooms in Clarinda Street…. luncheons and hot dinners at night; meals at all hours.’ It was a good time to buy. Parkes’ Annual Show ran from late August into early September and Clarinda Street would invariably be packed.

Before the Great Depression, so thriving was the town and surrounds that it boasted 10 hotels. As the economy tightened, jobs were cut, food rationed and the hours reduced for many even with regular work. A voucher system was used at the major department stores like Howard & Sons, Burch’s and McGlynn’s.

Pep used to collect the discarded shoeboxes and lids and take them around to the local fish and chip shop, run by Herb and Alison Moon. On Friday nights he and his best mate Aub Lovelock were known to gather as many as 40 boxes. The Moon’s [sic] would pay them sixpence a dozen. They were the ideal size for a weekend feast.

Pep and his brother Keith would always be on the lookout for lemonade and ginger beer bottles. They were worth a halfpenny apiece and it provided the boys some extra monies for lollies and the Saturday afternoon matinee. Pep’s mother Jo took in boarders and made meals for the local police. She also did extra washing. Somehow she made ends meet, but only just. If there was any money left over it could go into a tin until there was enough for a night at the movies or to buy from the cobbler a reconditioned pair of shoes for one of the kids. She couldn’t afford to buy new.

K. Piesse (2018) pages 6 and 7

By comparison to children today, it appeared a hard life. However it was the life they knew and it appeared that they made the most of it. The brother of Pep’s best mate, Bill Lockwood, recalled to Ken Piesse his impression of Pep as “…a typical larrikin, but he didn’t hurt anybody. He was always laughing and joking. He was never too serious about anything.” (Piesse 2018, p8)

Life in the bigger town with its vibrant main street, two cinemas, goldmines and girls suited Pep.

Despite the extremes in the weather, Pep, Keith and their schoolmates would play cricket, tennis and golf five, six and even seven days a week. Their pick-up cricket games were always highly competitive, old bulli beef tins or light-poles being used for wickets.

K. Piesse (2018) page 7

Pepper and Cricket in Parkes

While contemporary school students need to stay in school until 17 years of age, it was vastly different in the 1930s. Piesse states that Pep left school in his early teens, working “…as a striker at the local coach-building and blacksmith’s shop on the corner of Church and Bogan Streets. It was owned and run by local identities Reg Cheney and Les Miller.” (Piesse, 2018 page 9). Other work included cutting the suckers off of felled trees at various farm properties. A side effect of this arduous labour, was that the young teen developed broad shoulders. This only added to his impressive physique.

By his late teens Pep was already a six-footer (183cm) and approaching 13 stone (82kg).

For one with such an imposing physique, he was extraordinarily light on his feet. As a boy he’d travel 40 miles and cross three rivers for a game of cricket. He also loved tennis and in the mid-’30s even defeated Goulburn’s Bill Sidwell, a future Davis Cup player and Grand Slam title winner in the singles final of the Central Western District. Sidwell was four years older and on the verge of a momentous career. Keith  still remembers that match. “I think it was 6-1, 6-1,” he said.

K. Piesse (2018) page 9

Reproduction of a whole page photograph in Ken Piesse's book. It shows how far Cec Pepper's monster 165 yard hit from the southern end of Woodward Park in Parkes during the 1935-36 season. Source: Piesse, K. (2018). Pep: The story of cec pepper the best cricketer never to play for Australia. Mount Eliza, Victoria: Ken Piesse Football & Cricket Books.

Reproduction of a whole page photograph in Ken Piesse’s book. It shows how far Cec Pepper’s monster 165 yard hit from the southern end of Woodward Park in Parkes during the 1935-36 season. Source: Piesse, K. (2018). Pep: The Story of Cec Pepper The Best Cricketer Never to Represent Australia. Mount Eliza, Victoria: Ken Piesse Football & Cricket Books. page 12

Pepper’s cricketing prowess was first noticed when he was fifteen years old. The sports reporter from Western Champion referred to him as “a promising colt” as Pepper and another Parkes local (only known as Thomas) helped Parkes make 131 to defeat Forbes in a Grinsted Cup match. Forbes were initially on top when they had Parkes at 3-20. Pepper and his partner added 73, with Pep top-scoring with 48. (Piesse, 2018, p.9-10). This was the beginning of Pep becoming a local legend.

Just weeks earlier [than the match against Forbes], Pepper had been included, just two days shy of his 15th birthday, in Parkes’ first XI against Alan Kippax’s touring International and NSW State team at People’s Park (see chapter 3), a match which saw the record-breaking Don Bradman play in Parkes for a second time.

The 1931-32 season was the start of five momentous inter-town years for the gifted, confident and charismatic teenager who soon was to be regarded as the most talented all-round sportsman in the central west…

From the time a 15-year-old Pepper first appeared in 1931-32, Parkes was Grinsted Cup holders each and every year until his transfer to Sydney in 1936. For two season in a row (1933-34 and 1934-35) it went undefeated in all Challenge matches, with Pepper’s contributions pivotal.

One early match barely lasted 30 minutes withe opposition bowled out for 21. Opening up, Pepper hit four 6s in the first over, Parkes winning by 10 wickets.

K. Piesse (2018) pages 10 and 11

In the days before email and mobile phones, Pepper's wife relied on cablegrams from overseas about her husband's whereabouts. Source: Sydney Morning Herald Thursday 4 October, 1945 page 7

In the days before email and mobile phones, Pepper’s wife relied on cablegrams from overseas about her husband’s whereabouts. Source: Sydney Morning Herald Thursday 4 October, 1945 page 7

World War 2 & Cricket

Many sportsmen had their sporting careers interrupted (in some cases ended) by the outbreak of World War 2. After six long years of war, when Germany surrendered, England turned to sport to raise much-needed funds and revive public morale. Cricket was one of the sports that England used. With so many Australian servicemen still in Britain, an Australian Services XI was formed. According to Roland Perry OAM – author and historian – the Australian Services XI was:

“…. [a] team comprised solely military service personnel. The team played matches against English cricket sides of both military and civilian origins to celebrate the end of the war. These matches were aimed at increasing morale in the war-ravaged English cities and as a means of reviving cricket after the conclusion of fighting.

R. Perry (2005) p. 102

Photograph of a blazer worn by Cec Pepper and his teammates in the Australian Services XI. The description on the website states that this is a single breasted navy blue blazer with two patch pockets below the waist and an embroidered patch pocket on the left breast. The embroidery consists of a yellow rising sun over a white eagle with an green leaf spray below. The words 'ENGLAND INDIA AUSTRALIA AUST. SERVICES XI 1945' are embroidered in yellow at the bottom. The blazer body is unlined except for a yoke of wool across the upper back. The sleeves are lined with white cotton. There are three brass RAAF buttons on the front with a smaller RAAF button on each cuff. This particularly blazer belonged to Sergeant Charles Frederick Thomas Price. Source: Australian War Memorial website

Photograph of a blazer worn by the Australian Services XI. The description on the website states that this is a single breasted navy blue blazer with two patch pockets below the waist and an embroidered patch pocket on the left breast. The embroidery consists of a yellow rising sun over a white eagle with an green leaf spray below. The words ‘ENGLAND INDIA AUSTRALIA AUST. SERVICES XI 1945’ are embroidered in yellow at the bottom. The blazer body is unlined except for a yoke of wool across the upper back. The sleeves are lined with white cotton. There are three brass RAAF buttons on the front with a smaller RAAF button on each cuff. This particularly blazer belonged to Sergeant Charles Frederick Thomas Price. Source: Australian War Memorial website

The series of matches between England and Australian servicemen became known as the Victory Tests, “…to celebrate the end of hostilities.” (Perry, 2005 p.103)

Ed Jaggard, who was reviewing Ian Woodward’s book Cricket, Not War: The Australian Services XI and the ‘Victory Tests’ of 1945 noted:

This team of ‘battlers’, on tour for almost ten months until they disbanded in Hobart at the end of January 1946, played their best cricket in England. There they provided genuine entertainment because under Hassett’s captaincy they always pursued a result, scoring their runs quickly and relying heavily on high quality spin bowling. While the legendary all-rounder Keith Miller was a natural crowd pleaser, especially with his flamboyant batting, Cec Pepper was not far behind. Hitter of prodigious sixes, and a far more penetrating bowler than Miller, Pepper was a potential match winner in all conditions….

E. Jaggard (1996) p. 157

However Australian sporting bureaucracy wasn’t too far away. Australian cricket administrators decided to not accred the three-day matches as official Test matches. Their argument was that there were not enough Test-level players in the armed services; Lindsay Hassett was the only Australian who had Test experience. (Perry, 2005, p. 103-104; Pollard, 1988, p. 366; and Whittington, 1981, p.65) However after discovering packed English grounds and the fact the Victory Tests raised a lot of money for war charities; the Services XI were ordered to play games in Australia after having played games in India and Sri Lanka (then called Ceylon). While today’s cricketers are millionaires who travel first class to destinations, Piesse paints an entirely different picture of Cec Pepper and his teammates:

Members of the Services XI thought it almost surreal when they caught their first glimpse of the West Australian coastline from their twin-engine Avro York. For some, it meant their first Christmas at home in five years. The battered old transporter, complete with bullet-holes in its flanks from four years of being shot at by the Japanese, wasn’t the fastest and didn’t seem the safest. The players clustered inside on a thin perimeter ledge for all of the 3600 mile (6000 km) trip from Colombo, their luggage spread evenly out at their feet. Pepper and Keith Miller, two of the heaviest, were on opposite sides in case of any weight imbalance. By the time they bumped down in Fremantle, they’d flown for the best part of 20 hours. They were out on their feet. It was December 22, 1945, three days before Christmas.

K. Piesse (2018) p. 83

However it was not a pleasant greeting upon their landing. Players became suspicious upon seeing a swarm of suits, press and officials. The players were right to be suspicious as Ken Piesse details below:

After handshakes, the news was soon conveyed to the group that more matches Australia-wide were on their immediate agenda… The fixture handed them was demanding: seven four-dayers in seven cities over 40 days. There was little or no time off. Christmas with loved ones was suddenly on hold….

The team had played 60 matches in three countries in nine and a half months. They’d just flown two 10-hour legs, interrupted only by an overnight stop to refuel. They were incredibly weary and fatigued.

K.Piesse (2018) p. 83 and 85

The Australian Services XI had been told their matches were not official Test matches, yet they had to play – even Australian prime minister John Curtin wanted them to play – a series of matches that involved further travel. When the players complained, the press reported their complaints leading to an immediate public outcry. It was against this backdrop that Pepper would come across ‘The Don’ – a meeting that would change Pep’s life and cricketing career.

Pepper and Don Bradman

It is difficult to read about the following, such is the popular status of ‘The Don’; an Australian icon and a sportsman of international renown. However Ken Piesse reports that when Pepper’s Services XI played South Australia, it was two vociferous appeals for LBW against Bradman that lead to Pepper’s cards being marked “never to be selected for Australia”. Piesse’s opening chapter of Pep: The Story of Cec Pepper, The Best Cricketer Never To Represent Australia is called “Fifteen Seconds of Infamy” and goes into detail about Cecil Pepper arguing with the umpires that Bradman should have been given out at least once. The previous section explains the weary bodies and minds that would have led anyone to be prone to give way to their emotions. However Bradman playing for South Australia also had an interesting backstory – one which Pep would have been unaware of.

Ken Piesse, writing for Sportshounds website in June 2018, explains:

There was tremendous excitement when Don Bradman, 37, made himself available for the South Australian fixture. He’d played just one representative game in five years and been invalided out of the Army, spending much of the war incapacitated and at times not even able to raise his right arm to shave.  

In Adelaide on the second morning of the match, more than 10,000 Bradman-worshippers appeared, hoping for Australian cricket’s Colossus to make yet another century.

K. Piesse at www.sportshounds.com.au

Don Bradman had lifted the spirits of a nation during The Great Depression, fellow “Invincible” Sam Loxton stating that Bradman “…lit up the nation…” during those grim days. Now after the ravages of a second world war, the Australian public looked to ‘The Don’ to lift them again. However, as Piesse points out, to lift the spirits would require Bradman to make a creditable scoreline:

Adelaide Oval, New Year’s Eve 1945: Ten thousand fans were on their feet and roaring like they were at a footy final…..

The conquering hero was back; the golden boy, the greatest batsman in the world. The cheering could be heard back over the Torrens and into town…..

Everyone had eyes only for one man, the Don, cricket’s ultimate run machine. Other than one home fixture just days earlier, Bradman had been absent from representative cricket for five years….

Entering the game, the Don, 37, was still undecided about playing again. A failure could bring a halt to any plans of a comeback. All of Adelaide, all of Australia, knew the importance of a big score in this match. ‘All the Services bowlers wanted to claim the biggest scalp in the history of cricket’, according to author Roland Perry, ‘and go down in the sport’s annals as “the bowler who ended Bradman’s career.”

K. Piesse (2018) p. 1-2

The stakes were high for both Bradman and Pepper. ‘The Don’ was anxious for a good score to announce a comeback, while Cec had just turned down a lucrative offer to play professionally for Rochdale in the Lancashire Leagues. Pep wanted to represent his country.

In Pepper moved, eyes only for Bradman’s stumps. He wanted this wicket like few others. He cared little for local sentiment. He was intent on spoiling the party…..

Within minutes at the opposite end, Pepper held a chest high catch at slip and was amazed when umpire LA ‘Lav’ Smith rejected the triumphant shout. Everyone was up, particularly those closest to the action, wicketkeeper Stan Sismey, ‘Pep’ and Albert Cheetham at silly mid-off. Writing in the Adelaide Advertiser Harry Kneebone said the position of the South Australian team would have been desperate had umpire Smith upheld the appeal…..

Now came the explosive moment which was to totally change the direction of his entire career.

After a quiet beginning, Bradman had begun to surge….. Pepper instinctively knew it was time for his flipper, his piece de resistance delivery, which he squeezed out the front of his hand, with little discernible change of action. Momentarily stuck on the crease, Bradman was disconcerted by the trajectory and was struck on the back pad plumb in front. A jubilant Pepper roared his appeal only for umpire Scott to shake his head. Several balls later, Pepper launched another flipper and once again Bradman was deceived and struck low down. This one looked even straighter. Time seemed to stand still as Scott deliberated. Ten thousand sets of eyes were on him. Slowly shaking his head he again said: “Not out”. There were roars of approval from the pro-Bradman crowd.

Pepper exploded: “What do you ‘ave to do to get the little bastard out? You’re a f&*#ing cheat!”….

Bradman approached Scott. “Do we have to put up with this sort of thing, Jack?” he said…..

Scott was a full-time employee of the South Australian Cricket Association. In view of Bradman’s complaint, he believed he had no alternative but to report the incident to authorities…. When it was referred to the austere Australian Cricket Board of Control, Pepper was immediately consigned to cricketing purgatory.

K. Piesse (2018) p. 2-3

Keith Miller “…agreed Pep should have been a ‘caste-iron certainty’ for NZ…” and stated as much:

It would be a poor look out for all of us if our careers were held forfeit for one remark said in temper. Bradman should have realised that and intervened on Pepper’s behalf. He could have done so very easily. Surely [Bradman] had the power to save Pepper, who at the time, in my opinion, was the best allrounder in the world.

Miller cited by K. Piesse (2018) p. 93

Pepper: The Post-Bradman Years

With the offer from Rochdale still on the table, Pep left Australia and became a Lancashire cricket legend. After retiring from playing Pep shocked everyone by becoming an umpire. After years of berating and haranguing umpires with many appeals, now Pep was to go to the “other side”. Yet he didn’t exactly find himself on the receiving end. Even as a match official, Pep still marched to the beat of his own drum.

Most found Pepper to be an excellent umpire, forthright, honest, receptive and a friend to the players. They liked his sense of humor [sic], quips and one-liners.

K. Piesse (2018) p. 157

Pepper Spray: Quoting Pep

It is not possible to publish all of Pepper’s sayings in this blog post. Indeed many of them require context to understand and appreciate them fully. Ken Piesse faithfully reproduces them in his book

Pep: The Story of Cec Pepper, The Best Cricketer Never To Represent Australia

historyparkes has reproduced a few memorable Pepper quotes, to give a taste of the amusing and often hilarious responses that Pepper came up with.

“It’s a great day for a six boys!”

K. Piesse (2018) p. 18

 

“All right, you can open your f&*#ing eyes now. I’ve finished.” Pep to a Colne tailender who was mesmerised by his bowling

K. Piesse (2018) p. 109

 

At Ebbe Vale with the match petering to a no-result, diminutive Glamorgan right-hander Bernard Hedges was at his most obstinate, tapping even half volleys back to the bowlers. At the end of one over from Warwickshire’s Jack Bannister, Pepper handed him his sweater. “For God’s sake Jack,” he said. “Hit ‘im on the pads and I’ll give this bugger out.”

Despite Bannister’s best efforts, he was unable to convince his captain into allowing him an extra over from Pepper’s end. Tom Cartwright took his place and as he was re-stepping out his run-up, Bannister raced up and quietly relayed the message: “Bowl straight and you might just get a bonus lb” Within a delivery or two Cartwright beat the Hedges defensive prod. The ball was going down the leg side by a good way but the Cartwright appeal was full throated and believable. “Not ouuttt,” said Pepper derisively. “And don’t believe everything you hear from that bloody fool Bannister.”

K. Piesse (2018) p. 158

 

“Botham? Vastly overrated. It’s a sore point that he is talked of as a world-class allrounder and compared with Sobers, Miller and me. I don’t think he would have got into the Somerset team before the war…. I could have bowled him out with a cabbage with the outside leaves still on it. And a as a bowler? Well he wouldn’t have been good enough for Bradman.” Pep when asked about modern cricketers

K. Piesse (2018) p. 169

Book Launch For Pep

At the Pep book launch held in Parkes Shire Library are (left to right): Jeanette Bond (nèe Pepper), Lawrence Bond, Helen Whiter, John Whiter all standing; Keith Pepper, Cec's brother and author Ken Piesse, seated. Photograph by Dan Fredericks (Parkes Shire Library) taken on November 16th, 2018

At the Pep book launch held in Parkes Shire Library are (left to right): Jeanette Bond (nèe Pepper), Lawrence Bond, Helen Whiter, John Whiter all standing; Keith Pepper, Cec’s brother and author Ken Piesse, seated. Photograph by Dan Fredericks (Parkes Shire Library) taken on November 16th, 2018

Friday November 16th 2018 saw an eager crowd of approximately 60 people attend the book launch of Pep: The Story of Cec Pepper, The Best Cricketer Never To Represent Australia by Ken Piesse. In attendance was author and keynote speaker, Ken Piesse. Cec’s brother, Keith, travelled up from Wollongong to come back home – no mean feat considering he is 97 years old! Accompanying Keith Pepper were daughter and son-in-law Jeanette and Lawrence Bond, as well as Cec’s son John Whiter and his wife Helen. Official proceedings were opened by Parkes Town Crier, Tim Creith. Emceeing duties were conducted by Mayor Councillor Ken Keith OAM, who introduced the guest speakers including ABC Central West’s “Mr Sport” Geoff Mann, cricket historian Michael Greenwood and Parkes’ “Mr Cricket” Gregory Morrissey. The assembled crowd were informed that Ken was inspire by Greg, who first informed him of Pepper’s exploits.

Ken stated that the

“….book was five years in the making and features first-hand accounts of Pepper’s sons John, first born Hugh and youngest son Paul.

He was the best all rounder in the world and the highest paid cricketer.

To have those first-hand memories of the boys is really special.

I’m just so grateful to be here.”

C. Little on Parkes Champion Post website

Author and keynote speaker Ken Piesse busy signing copies of his latest cricket book. Photograph by Dan Fredericks (Parkes Shire Library) taken on November 16th, 2018

Author Ken Piesse busy signing copies of his latest cricket book. Photograph by Dan Fredericks (Parkes Shire Library) taken on November 16th, 2018

To purchase your copy of
Pep: The Story of Cec Pepper, The Best Cricketer Never To Represent Australia
by Ken Piesse head to www.cricketbooks.com.au
Alternatively, copies are available at Parkes News & Gifts

Parkes Shire Library would like to thank the following people and organisations for their assistance with this blog post:

If you have stories of Cecil Pepper that you are willing to share please contact Parkes Shire Library via library@parkes.nsw.gov.au so that they can be shared and kept for posterity on this blog. Alternatively, you may leave comments on this page.

REFERENCE LIST

Feature Picture Images (clockwise from top centre)

Olympians of the Parkes Shire Blog Entries

Read about Rex Aubrey – Parkes Shire’ first Olympian
Read about Ted McGlynn – the smiling sprinter
Read about Jim Bailey – misunderstood middle-distance misfit
Read about Stephen Davies – the “Maradona” of Hockey
Read about Nira Stove – first female Olympian of  the Parkes Shire
Read about Peter McMahon – Tullamore talent experiences Olympic tragedy
Read about Mariah Williams – Middleton maestro inspired by “Maradona”
Read about Scott Westcott – from Alectown to Copacabana (via Newcastle)

Other Blog Entries on sport & the Parkes Shire

Read about Harrison Park
Read about People’s Park/Memorial Oval – Early Days to 1940s
Read about Lindner Oval, Peak Hill
Read about Berryman Park, Trundle
Read about Armstrong Park
Read about 1970 Peak Hill Roosters Fly High
Read about Bogan Gate: Australian history merges in unique moment

 

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This entry was posted on December 19, 2018 by in 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, all-round sportsperson, Cec Pepper, controversy, cricket, Don Bradman, famous people of Parkes Shire, General history, Growing Up In Parkes, Humour, local historical articles, Making local news, Olympians of the Parkes Shire, Parkes, Parkes Library Family & Local History Resources, Pep Book Launch, Pepper and Cricket in Parkes, Pepper and Don Bradman, Quoting Pepper, Second World War soldiers from Parkes Shire, Uncategorized, World War 2 and Cricket and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .
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